Welcome back reloading!

I’ve not really said anything about this, but the last two years have been particularly trying.

Up until May this year, I had my elderly dad living with me and I have to say it was not easy. Old age brings its own challenges, but there were some complicating factors which made it all especially difficult.

In the end, I got so burned out, I pretty much lost my independence and all my hobbies and interests went on the backburner. That’s an experience I hope never to repeat.

I didn’t completely lose my way as a shooter though. There were one or two guns on the list which I managed to pick up in the meantime, such as this Marlin:

Marlin 1895SBL laminate stock in 45-70.

If you’re a cinema goer, you may recall this as being the same model toted by Chris Pratt in the first Jurassic World film. And what a gun it is!

It was to be a few more months before I got to try it out.

Thankfully, exhausted as I was,  I didn’t lose the ability to have a laugh.  It’s a valuable way of letting off steam.

Definitely too much time (and foil) on his hands.

Eventually, I had to stop being an impromptu carer or I really was destined for a tinfoil hat. So, very reluctantly, I had to broach the tricky subject of Dad going into full-time care. Damn, that was the hardest conversation of my entire life.

My father went into care in May and I was expecting to then launch myself straight back into everything.

Nnneeeegh – wrong! Instead, I sat in a stupor for about two weeks, just slowly recharging my batteries and then, eventually, mulling over what I wanted to do with the business and hobbies.

Small steps first – I spent a few more weeks repairing the house and getting my office and dealership space as I need them.

Shelves yet to be filled, but I dare say that will happen.

The various spaces aren’t fully utilised yet, but that is partly deliberate. You always need room to expand and so I’ve built that in.

So much reloadng; so little time!

I feel particularly lucky to have a really nice reloading area. Handloading was another aspect to the shooting hobby which I always enjoyed, but which just died off while I was otherwise occupied. I’ve now started up again and am enjoying getting back into it.

The place needs tidying. That’s next…

I once asked someone what sort of space was needed for a reloading setup and the droll reply was, “twice as much as you originally planned for!” They were right. Reloading expands to fill the space available and then just overflows everywhere. Space – the final frontier. Have plenty of it, if you can.

If you must think, Jon, at least try and look intelligent while doing it.

45-70 Govt is a new one on me. In the intervening two years, I have acquired two or three guns which I have still yet to fire, one of which is the Marlin 1895SBL shown above. I like straight-walled cartridges; they’re nice and easy to work with.

Trail Boss, one of my all-time favourite powders. Or was, until the EU banned it.

Trail Boss is the powder for now. The Marlin can take some very stiff loads but I’m working with very modest ones here. This is partly because all the bullets I have are plain cast lead (without gas checks – the copper gaskets you need to have on the base of a lead bullet being drive at more than 1,100 fps). I’m also naturally cautious when starting a new calibre. It’s a good idea not to go crazy and start making powerful loads until you’re sure of what you’re doing.

Primed and filled, just waiting for bullets to be seated.

A visual inspection of all cases after adding powder. Making sure they all actually have powder and that none are under or over-filled.

Just look at the size of those buggers!

405gr cast lead bullets; real beasts. The 45-70 can fell a bear so it’s a big old round. The cartridge was originally used in guns like the Springfield trapdoor and other single-shot rifles. It’s a 45-70 because it’s 45 calibre and originally would have had 70 grains of black powder.

405gr round-nose, flat-point cast bullets.

Once the visual inspection is complete, I pop an inverted bullet on top of each case. This means I know they are all ready to go and also prevents powder spillage or other accidents if you accidentally nudge the tray.

One of my favourite bits. A handful of freshly made ammo.

And there they are, a handful of newly-made 45-70 Govt rounds.  Anything going into a tubular magazine needs a nice firm crimp, otherwise the bullets can get forced back into the cases under recoil and then the internal pressure goes up.

I’m looking forward to trying them out. It should be good fun.